Lena Dunham thinks she’s ‘problematized by the culture’ she was raised in


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Here are some photos of Lena Dunham taking part in a Q&A session at South X Southwest over the weekend. Lena has stuff happening, and she’s making a lot of deals post-Girls. She and Jenni Konner will be writing Jennifer Garner’s return-to-TV show, Camping, and there are various book deals and whatever. I’ve stopped paying attention for the most part, because I thought we all agreed that the Aurora Perrineau situation was the final straw? To be fair, many of you canceled Lena way before she defended an alleged rapist and called a young African-American woman a liar, but I hoped that after that moment, zero people were ever going to take Lena’s side ever again. But then she went through a shady public breakup and revealed that she had a hysterectomy, and I guess some public sympathy came to her. Whatever, peeps. You can think that Lena had it rough were her hysterectomy & breakup AND you can believe she’s a terrible human being.

But I digress. The point of this is that Lena thinks she’s still a thing, and she thinks she’s waged a successful comeback, and that she can simply ignore the whole Aurora Perrineau debacle. Which is why Lena did the Q&A at SXSW. Some quotes from her talk:

The reaction to all of the nudity in Girls: “I found there was so much vitriol from other women who had body types similar to mine. There was this energy of ‘How dare you think it’s appropriate to take your clothing off on television and expose all of our secrets?’ I really felt that vitriol and anger coming from them.”

Dearing with criticism: “I have two modes. I’m either full of shame, thinking ‘I should have never been let out of my house in the first place,’ or, ‘Nobody even deserves me — they don’t deserve my truth.’ But it goes away really fast.”

Criticism about diversity: “There were huge conversations about diversity around the show that were some of the most educational and important conversations of my life. Those are the moments that criticism teaches you about yourself, and your blind spots, and the ways you’ve been problematized by the culture you’ve been raised in. So, there was a lot of criticism I felt grateful for.”

The celebrity role model: “I didn’t get into this to be a perfect celebrity role model. I don’t know how to do it. That’s not my skill set.” She’s come to terms and has grown from the criticisms saying, “I started to move away from the sense that I don’t need to have an opinion about everything. I think about what I say. Criticism teaches you about yourself and your blind spots.”

[From The Hollywood Reporter and Variety]

“…The ways you’ve been problematized by the culture you’ve been raised in…” OH FOR F–KS SAKE. Way to take ownership, …read more

Source:: Cele|bitchy


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