34 things you should remove from your résumé immediately

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Every job application starts with a résumé.

Hiring managers gather résumés to determine when to interview promising candidates — and many use robots to eliminate bad ones before it even reaches a human.

If you want to pass that test, you need to have the perfect résumé to highlight your qualifications.

Here are 34 things you should never include on your résumé.

Jacquelyn Smith, Vivian Giang, and Natalie Walters contributed to earlier versions of this article.

SEE ALSO: 9 things you should never do during your first week of work

Don’t put an “objective” on your résumé.

If you applied, it’s already obvious you want the job.

The exception: If you’re in a unique situation, such as changing industries, it may be useful to include a short summary.

Don’t put your hobbies on your résumé.

If it’s not relevant to the job you’re applying for, it’s a waste of space and a waste of the company’s time.

Don’t lie.

A CareerBuilder survey asked 2,000 hiring managers for memorable résumé mistakes, and blatant lies were a popular choice. One candidate claimed to be the former CEO of the company to which he was applying, another claimed to be a Nobel Prize winner, and one more claimed he attended a college that didn’t exist.

Rosemary Haefner, chief human resources officer at CareerBuilder, said these lies may be “misguided attempts to compensate for lacking 100% of the qualifications specified in the job posting.”

But Haefner said candidates should concentrate on the skills they can offer, rather than the skills they can’t.

“Hiring managers are more forgiving than job seekers may think,” Haefner explained. “About 42% of employers surveyed said they would consider a candidate who met only three out of five key qualifications for a specific role.”

  35 years ago the Senate held hearings on rock lyrics. It was a First Amendment showdown for the ages.

Leave irrelevant work experience out.

Yes, you might have been the “king of making milkshakes” at the restaurant you worked for in high school. But unless you are planning on redeeming that title, it’s time to get rid of all that clutter.

But as Alyssa Gelbard, a career expert and founder of the career-consulting firm Résumé Strategists, pointed out, past work experience that might not appear to be directly relevant to the job at hand might show another dimension, depth, ability, or skill that’s relevant.

Only include this experience if it really showcases additional skills that can translate to the position you’re applying for.

You don’t need to disclose your relationship status in a professional résumé.

Don’t include your marital status, religious preference, or Social Security number.

This might have been the standard in the past, but all this information is now illegal for your employer to ask from you, so don’t include it.

Putting your age on your résumé could be a hindrance.

If you don’t want to be discriminated against for a position because of your age, it’s time to remove your graduation date, said Catherine Jewell, the author of “New Résumé, New Career.”

Another surprising way your résumé could give away your age: double spaces after a period.

Remove inconsistent formatting.

The format of your résumé is …read more

Source:: Business Insider

      

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