Democracy should mean our elected leaders making ­decisions – NOT unaccountable judges deciding how we should live

Where’s justice?

Who governs Britain?

Is it our democratically elected leaders making laws in the mother of all ­Parliaments?

AlamyThe Supreme Court ruling refusing permission for an oilfield in Surrey will now make it harder for companies to drill almost anywhere in Britain[/caption]

AlamyIs the judiciary, so empowered by New Labour’s Human Rights Act and Equality Act that almost nothing is off limits?[/caption]

Or is it the judiciary, so empowered by New Labour’s Human Rights Act and Equality Act that almost nothing is off limits?

This week the Supreme Court refused permission for an oilfield in Surrey because the local council hadn’t taken into account the polluting effects of that oil.

Not in Surrey. Just wherever in the world it was burned.

Their ruling will now make it harder for companies to drill almost anywhere in Britain.

The eco-clowns — who wilfully mis­understand our energy security needs ­— are cheering away happily.

But is it really for the courts to make policy — and laws — on the hoof like this?

We have already seen the European Court of Human Rights declare Switzerland’s climate change policies unlawful.

Its ruling suggested actions by democratic governments were by themselves not enough to protect citizens properly.

The implication is that only our learned judges know what is good for us.

Democracy does not mean having unelected and unaccountable judges deciding how we should live our lives.

It is for elected leaders to make ­decisions.

And if they get it wrong we can at least vote them out.

UK needs ideas

AlamyDespite extra funding hospitals are still under massive pressure[/caption]

HOW many times have you heard the phrase: “Nothing works in this country.”?

A financial crisis, a pandemic, global mass migration and a war in Europe have wreaked havoc on every aspect of our lives.

Deep-rooted problems exist in work, health and social care, welfare, criminal justice and transport which need radical and fundamental solutions.

Chucking billions at them and collectively crossing our fingers doesn’t work.

As Leo McKinstry argues, the burden of our bloated unreformed public sector is now overbearing.

It is crushing the country while our overpaid civil servants conspire to do less and less.

So we ask again during this Election campaign: where are the big ideas?

Prince Chills

PAAfter such a difficult couple of years, how wonderful that at 42, Wills looks so relaxed and happy.[/caption]

IN the last couple of years Prince William has had to deal with the kind of stress that would place a heavy burden on most people.

He’s lost his grandmother, got a new job with heavy responsibility and seen his wife diagnosed with cancer — all while caring for a young family.

So how wonderful that at 42, Wills looks so relaxed and happy.

Perhaps he can pass on a few tips to the England players.

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