Poll: Only half of Utahns say they’d take FDA-approved COVID-19 vaccine

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Pharmacist Nicole Mendenhall poses for a photo with a dose of Fluzone Quadrivalent influenza vaccine, manufactured by Sanofi Pasteur, at the Harmons City Creek pharmacy in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020.

Pharmacist Nicole Mendenhall poses for a photo with a dose of Fluzone Quadrivalent influenza vaccine, manufactured by Sanofi Pasteur, at the Harmons City Creek pharmacy in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020. | Spenser Heaps, Deseret News

SALT LAKE CITY — Melanie Hill doesn’t do well with flu shots. In fact, she typically got her annual injection on a Friday knowing she would be sick for a couple of days.

For that reason, the Lehi resident said she likely won’t get a COVID-19 vaccine.

“For probably the last five years or six years I haven’t gotten (a flu shot) and actually had healthier winters. I don’t think my body responds well to the flu,” said Hill, the mother of two high schoolers and one in elementary school.

“I vaccinate my kids. My husband will probably get it, but my body doesn’t do well with it.”

Hill is among nearly a quarter of Utahns who say they would not take an FDA-approved COVID-19 vaccine if it were available, according to a new Deseret News/Hinckley Institute of Politics poll.

And nearly another quarter of Utahns say they don’t know if they’d take it.

The survey of 1,000 likely voters in Utah found 52% of residents would get the vaccine, 24% would not and 23% said they aren’t sure. The poll conducted by Scott Rasmussen on Sept. 7-12 has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.1 percentage points.

“I just don’t trust it where it’s so new. I want to see what other healthier bodies would do with it before I would get it,” Hill said. “I have friends who legit believe that there’s a microchip in it and it’s a government scam. I don’t believe that.”

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Scientists have been racing to develop a vaccine against the novel coronavirus since the outbreak began. Three of the six leading candidates are in the final testing stage and could be submitted to the Food and Drug Administration for approval by the end of the year.

The U.S. has spent billions of dollars on research to quickly develop multiple COVID-19 vaccines. But public fear that a vaccine is unsafe or ineffective could hinder efforts to inoculate millions of Americans.

“People are kind of afraid of new things. We were already kind of riding the wave of anti-vaccine sentiment. That was increasing and then you get this new vaccine that hasn’t been tested,” said Brian Poole, an assistant professor of microbiology and molecular biology at Brigham Young University.

Poole just finished a study looking at why people are hesitant about getting a COVID-19 vaccine. Most worry about the side effects and that it’s being rushed. Even those who are willing to have the vaccine fear the side effects will be worse than the disease, he said.

His study found that 68% of Americans would get the vaccine in the next 30 days. That jumps to 73% looking down the road six months, he said.

At least 60% to 70% of the population would need to take the vaccine to get the epidemic …read more

Source:: Deseret News – Utah News

      

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