Graves, top of photo, are prepared for Rhonita Miller, 30, and four of her children, Krystal and Howard, and twins Titus and Tiana, before their burial at a cemetery in LeBaron, Chihuahua state, Mexico, on Friday, Nov. 8, 2019. A total of three women and six of their children, from the extended LeBaron family, were gunned down in a cartel ambush while traveling along Mexico’s Chihuahua and Sonora state border on Monday. The graves in the foreground are not related to the burial of the Miller family. | Marco Ugarte, Associated Press

LA MORA, Mexico — U.S. citizens living in a small Mexican farming community established by their Mormon ancestors are trying to decide whether they should stay or leave after burying some of the nine American women and children slaughtered this week in a drug cartel ambush.

What had been a peaceful existence in a fertile valley ringed by rugged mountains and desert scrub about 70 miles from the border with Arizona became increasingly dangerous in recent years as cartels exerted their power and fought each other in Sonora state, a drug smuggling hotbed.

But La Mora, a hamlet of about 300 people where residents raise cattle and cultivate pomegranates, “will be forever changed” following the killings Monday as the women traveled with their children to visit relatives, a tearful David Langford told mourners at the funeral for his wife, Dawna Ray Langford, and their 11-year-old and 2-year-old sons.

”One of the dearest things to our lives is the safety of our family,” said Langford. “And I won’t feel safe. I haven’t for a few years here.”

On Friday, the bodies of Rhonita Miller and four of her children were being taken in a convoy of pickup trucks and SUVS, on the same dirt-and-rock mountainous road where they were killed, for burial in the community of Colonia LeBaron in Chihuahua state. Many residents of the two communities that lie a five-hour, bone-jarring drive apart are related and many have dual U.S.-Mexican citizenship.

Colonia LeBaron has been largely peaceful since the 2009 killing of one of its members who was an anti-crime activist prompted Mexican authorities to establish a security base. But the police presence in La Mora was negligible until the women and children were killed and authorities sent a swarm of state and federal police to the area. How long they stay could be crucial to the community’s future, residents said.

”The truth is we aren’t safe here as a community,” Langford said. “We live in the mountains, we have no access to authorities, or very, very little.”

Former La Mora Mayor Steven Langford predicted that as many as half of the community’s the residents could leave, turning it into a “ghost town.” The motive in the killings still isn’t known, though Mexican authorities have suggested the victims were in the wrong place at the wrong time as competing cartels fought over turf and may have mistaken the SUVs the women and children were in for rivals who travel in similar vehicles.

As he barbequed …read more

Source:: Deseret News – Utah News

      

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Stay or go? U.S. residents of Mexico town torn after 9 killed

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