NEW YORK (AP) – The Latest on the Pulitzer Prizes (all times local):

4:55 p.m.

The staff of The Advocate has won the Pulitzer Prize for local reporting for its series about Louisiana’s conviction system, including a Jim Crow-era law that let as few as 10 jurors convict people in criminal cases.

The award was announced Monday in New York. The Pulitzer committee called the series “a damning portrayal of the state’s discriminatory conviction system.”

Seven months after the series was published, voters overturned the law. Editor Peter Kovacs says that “we put an issue on the radar screen and more than 900,000 people voted for it.”

The newspaper is based in Baton Rouge, but staffers at The New Orleans Advocate wrote the series, and Kovacs was in New Orleans for the announcement.

The staff drank champagne from purple, green or gold plastic cups like those thrown from Mardi Gras floats.

___

4:35 p.m.

St. Louis Post-Dispatch columnist Tony Messenger has won a Pulitzer Prize for his series of columns about debtors’ prisons in Missouri.

The Pulitzer winners were announced Monday. Messenger won in the category of commentary.

Messenger found defendants across Missouri who owed thousands of dollars in “board bills” for time spent in jail even though they had fulfilled their sentences or served out parole.

As a result of his work, the Missouri Supreme Court ruled that judges can’t use courts to threaten indigent defendants with jail time, nor can they collect debts as court costs.

Post-Dispatch President and Publisher Ray Farris said Messenger’s work “exemplifies the highest standards of our profession.”

The newspaper also won a Pulitzer Prize, U.S. journalism’s highest honor, in 2015 for photographic coverage of the unrest in Ferguson after Michael Brown’s death.

___

4:15 p.m.

Three Los Angeles Times reporters have won the Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting for their coverage of a gynecologist accused of abusing hundreds of students at the University of Southern California.

Harriet Ryan, Matt Hamilton and Paul Pringle won the prize Monday for their stories about Dr. George Tyndall, which started with an anonymous tip Ryan received.

In the wake of the stories, the university’s president resigned, the Los Angeles Police Department launched an investigation and more than 650 women have sued USC, alleging the school failed to protect them from sexual abuse. Tyndall has denied the allegations.

Videos posted by their colleagues show the newsroom erupting into cheers when Ryan, Hamilton and Pringle’s win was announced live in New York.

One reporter posted the newsroom was celebrating with champagne.

___

3:55 p.m.

Jackie Sibblies Drury’s play “Fairview,” which skewers white people’s obsession with African American stereotypes, has won the 2019 Pulitzer Prize for drama.

“Fairview” begins as a contemporary domestic comedy involving a well-off black family and ends with the invisible fourth wall destroyed and the audience pulled down a rabbit hole involving race and identity.

The Pulitzer board called it a “hard-hitting drama that examines race in a highly conceptual, layered structure, ultimately bringing audiences into the actors’ community to face deep-seated prejudices.”

The play was originally commissioned and produced by Soho Rep and Berkeley Repertory Theatre. Sibblies Drury is New York City-based …read more

Source:: Daily times

      

(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)
The Latest: Louisiana newspaper wins local-reporting award

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *