THEN AND NOW: What 10 abandoned places in the US looked like before they became ruins

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grossinger's then and now

“Borscht Belt” resorts in the Catskills went out of style and have sat abandoned for decades.
Houston’s Astrodome used to host sports games and concerts, but is now empty except for when it’s used for shelter during natural disasters.
The Ohio State Reformatory in Mansfield, Ohio, is now a museum and features a tour led by a former prisoner.
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From once-glamorous summer resorts to eerie sanatoriums, abandoned buildings (and even whole cities) across the US remain shells of their former selves. But what were these eerily empty structures like in their prime?

Here’s what 10 abandoned places looked like before they were deserted and how they’ve since decayed.

The Pines Hotel in South Fallsburg, New York, was part of the “Borscht Belt,” a collection of resorts popular with New York City Jews in the 1950s and 1960s.

New York-based photographer Marisa Scheinfeld grew up in the Borscht Belt. She set out to capture the crumbling glamour of the once well-known destinations in a photography book called “The Borscht Belt.”

The ice skating rink at the Pines Hotel has seen better days.

In the 1960s, cheap air travel allowed a new generation to visit more exotic and warmer destinations, and the Borscht Belt was no longer the place to be.

Grossinger’s Resort, another Borscht Belt hotspot, was once known as the “Waldorf in the Catskills.”

At its peak, Grossinger’s had 150,000 visitors every year and hosted entertainers such as Eddie Fisher, Jerry Lewis, and Milton Berle, according to Atlas Obscura.

Elizabeth Taylor married Eddie Fisher there, and according to The New York Times, it served as the inspiration for the setting of “Dirty Dancing.”

It closed in 1986 and its once-glamorous swimming pools and gazebos are being overtaken by the surrounding woods.

The resort’s owner died in 1972 and the property was sold to a hotel developer, but nothing ever came of it.

From the 1880s to 1943, people with contagious diseases were quarantined on North Brother Island near New York City.

“Typhoid Mary” Mallon, an early 20th century cook who infected dozens with typhoid fever, was one of the island’s most infamous inhabitants. After World War II, North Brother Island was used to house veterans and later as a camp for troubled teens.

Today, most of its structures are on the verge of collapse.

The New York City Department of Parks and Recreation maintains the island as a bird sanctuary, and access to its crumbling remains of a morgue, boiler room, and dormitories is restricted.

The Ohio State Reformatory opened in 1896.

At its peak in 1955, the facility held 5,235 prisoners.

It closed in 1990 and is now a museum.

The site now offers tours (including one led by a former prisoner) and ghost hunting classes. It has also been featured in many film and TV productions, most famously “The Shawshank Redemption.”

New York City’s first subway station, City Hall, opened in 1904.

The station was designed by Spanish engineer Rafael Guastavino, who was part of the City Beautiful design …read more


Source:: Business Insider

      

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